Disasters

Added by Karen Marston

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Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Oil Fire in Blue
Year: 2011
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 48" x 72"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Fire and Ice
Year: 2010
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 16" x 20"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Disaster
Year: 2010
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 60" x 48"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Floating Fire
Year: 2010
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 14" x 14"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Desert Fire
Year: 2011
    • Category: Multimedia
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 24" x 30"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Tornado #4
Year: 2012
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 32" x 36"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Tornado #6
Year: 2012
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 32" x 36"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Tornado #8
Year: 2012
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 32" x 36"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Tornado #1
Year: 2011
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 32" x 36"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Wave Over Wall
Year: 2013
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 44" x 54"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Hurricane Wave and Traffic Light
Year: 2013
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 54" x 44"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Wave and Pier
Year: 2013
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 20" x 16"
Artist: Karen Marston
Title: Utility Pole in Waves
Year: 2013
    • Category: Painting
    • Subject: Nature
    • Size: 15" x 11"

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  • Oil Fire in Blue
  • Fire and Ice
  • Disaster
  • Floating Fire
  • Desert Fire
  • Tornado #4
  • Tornado #6
  • Tornado #8
  • Tornado #1
  • Wave Over Wall
  • Hurricane Wave and Traffic Light
  • Wave and Pier
  • Utility Pole in Waves
  • Description: I have recently returned to an image I first paint... I have recently returned to an image I first painted twenty years ago during the Kuwait war: the oil fire. When the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, I was struck by the eerily familiar, terrifyingly dramatic image of these apocalyptic towers of black smoke and fire. Columns of smoke became an external manifestation of a certain post 9/11 zeitgeist, a jittery mood of fear, awaiting ever more sudden, unpredictable episodes of destruction, part of a growing litany of frightening disasters consuming the world around us—volcanoes, tornadoes, tsunamis, nuclear meltdowns, global warming, war upon war. I see these events on a continuum of our experience of the natural environment, part of the whole fabric of our landscape. I am as equally influenced by the history of awe inspired landscape painting (from Turner’s storms to Church’s icebergs), as by the stream of violent images in our daily news feed, as well as a direct dialog with nature and organic form; for me it is all connected.

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